I was playing my Nintendo DS, and the Pokémon game I was using wouldn't load. I thought that was strange, the pin on the game looked clean, and my ds played every other game inserted. Furthermore, I tried the Pokémon game on a different DS, the game started up, but would then freeze.
Pokemon video games are one of the more popular series of video games. Pokemon games have been around since the early 1990’s when they made their debut on the GameBoy & Game Boy Color video game console. Since their vast popularity and high sales, pokemon games are very susceptible to counterfeits and fake games.
Putting together a list of “The Best PlayStation 2 RPGs Games” is both easy and difficult. It’s easy in the sense that there’s no dearth of role-playing games—the system has more RPG titles than some short-lived consoles, like the TurboGrafx-16, has of any kind at all. The difficult part involves separating the wheat from the chaff.
The first thing I do when I encounter any expensive game is looking for serial numbers. For Nintendo 64 games, look in the cartridge slot. On authentic games, if you look in the groves of the N64 game, you see some numbering in the slots. 
Recently we obtained a box of some really Rare Super Nintendo titles.  At first glance, it was pretty obvious to tell these games were not authentic.  Below are points about how to spot these fake/ counterfeit "reproduction" SNES Games.
Today, we are going to take a look at the Best SNES Role Playing Games from the Super Nintendo stable. At The Old School Game Vault, we are fond of RPGs and it would make us happy if you the reader can discover some of the games that gave us so many happy memories growing up.
To the uninitiated, collecting Rare Atari Video Games might seem like a niche hobby. But nostalgia is a powerful thing, and this power translates to big dollars. Take the rare video-game market, for example. Certain titles can fetch thousands of dollars on auction sites or from private buyers—and we’re talking many thousands. 
For those of us who were young when the NES first hit markets, it represents a childhood filled with countless gaming memories. Finally beating the last level on Super Mario Bros, giggling maniacally as we shot down ducks in Duck Hunt and nearly tossing the controller after a single bullet grazed my leg and killed me in contra.
These days, game systems come with all kinds of I/O ports—USB, HDMI, Ethernet, Optical Audio and more. These portals are used to do everything from log online to connect digital cameras.
To paraphrase 19th Century British playwright Oscar Wilde, the Super NES Super Scope was awesome. Even if he never said that, he should have. Because it was.
You are going to need a few tools to get this going, A Small Philips Screw driver, A regular size Phillips screwdriver and a Flat Head Screw Driver.
  Tools Needed: will be Game Bit Opener, Cut-tip or Toothbrush, Rubbing Alcohol, and Paper Towel
In another article, I discussed the relative merits of the two main fifth-gen consoles—the Nintendo 64 and the PlayStation (One)—during their first holiday seasons after launch. 
The late 1970s saw the release of the Atari 2600 and the rise of the home gaming console. But by the early 1980s, it crashed and burned. This was due mostly to gamers’ frustration at sub-par games (“E.T. The Extra Terrestrial,” anyone?). The sentiment effectively killed the home-console market.
I’m a pretty big Final Fantasy fan. I came into the series with VII and have played everything since besides the MMOs and the two sequels to the lackluster XIII. I’ve had conversations with friends about what the Final Fantasy musical RPG that never was would have looked like (I would totally play that—good or bad, it would be hilarious).
Scour the furthest reaches of cyberspace, and you’ll find blog posts covering just about every video game accessory and piece of hardware there ever was. But one piece of console lore that remains woefully underreported is the NES Famicom Adapter.